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@SharedFuture

Jobs and freedom for Northern Ireland: MLK march 50th anniversary

Jobs and freedom for Northern Ireland: MLK march 50th anniversary
by Allan LEONARD for Shared Future News
28 August 2013

Sponsored by the US Consulate Belfast, the Washington-Ireland Programme and Politics Plus, Chris Lyttle MLA hosted a remembrance event at Parliament Buildings for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, with Martin Luther King Jr’s speech, “I have a dream”.

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@MrUlster

Book review – To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper LEE)

20120403 To Kill a Mockingbird

Somehow I escaped reading this essential school text, with its story of racism in 1930s American South. Living in Northern Ireland, I draw parallels with sectarianism, with its similar bigotry and prejudice.

To Kill a Mockingbird was part of a Unite Against Hate campaign event at Parliament Buildings in Northern Ireland, which I’ve written about separately.

There is one passage that directly deals with religious difference:

Miss Maudie settled her bridgework. “You know old Mr Radley was a foot-washing Baptist –”
“That’s what you are, ain’t it?” (says Scout)
My shell’s not that hard, child. I’m just a Baptist.”

I particularly like the lesson imparted by Scout’s father Atticus, on whether he was right or wrong to take on the doomed case of Tom Robinson:

“Scout, I couldn’t go to church and worship God if I didn’t try to help that man.”
“Atticus, you must be wrong…”
“How’s that?”
“Well, most folks seem to think they’re right and you’re wrong…”
“They’re certainly entitled to think that … but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to be able to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscious.”

That made me think of anti-Nazi campaigner Sophie Scholl’s exclaim, “We are your conscious!”

Indeed, after a classroom lesson on democracy, dictatorship and Hitler, Scout asked her older brother:

“[Miss Gates] went on today about how bad it was him treatin’ the Jews like that. Jem, it’s not right to persecute anybody, is it? I mean have mean thoughts about anybody, even, is it?”
“Gracious no, Scout. What’s eatin’ you?”
“Well, coming out of the court-house that night Miss Gates was … talking with Miss Stephanie Crawford. I heard her say it’s time somebody taught ’em a lesson, they were gettin’ way above themselves, an’ the next thing they think they can do is marry us. Jem, how can you hate Hitler so bad an’ then turn around and be ugly about folks right at home?”

So, it’s fine to agree what you deem wrong wherever it happens, but harder to address your own moral hypocrisies.

It’s clear why To Kill a Mockingbird is required reading for all, and why it has stood the test of time for over 50 years.

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@SharedFuture Photography Work

What does ‘unite’ mean to you?

What does ‘unite’ mean to you? Culture Night Belfast
by Allan LEONARD
15 October 2010

As part of Culture Night Belfast, which was supported by the Unite against Hate campaign, Moochin Photoman took some distinctive portrait photographs using a ‘Through the Viewfinder’ technique.

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@SharedFuture

Young people discuss CSI at Stormont @Cinemagic

Young people discuss CSI at Stormont @Cinemagic
by Allan LEONARD for Shared Future News
27 September 2010

As part of the Cinemagic International Film & Television Festival for Young People, and in conjunction with the Unite Against Hate campaign, there was a day event at Parliament Buildings, Stormont, home of the Northern Ireland Assembly.